They shoot horses, don’t they?

I had a chance to do a photo shoot at a horse farm near Okanagan Falls, B.C. today with the Penticton Photography Club. (Richard McGuire Photo)

I had a chance to do a photo shoot at a horse farm near Okanagan Falls, B.C. with members of the Penticton Photography Club.

I had a chance to do a photo shoot at a horse farm near Okanagan Falls, B.C. with members of the Penticton Photography Club. These were actually mules, evident by the long ears. A mule is a cross between a donkey and a horse. They rarely have offspring.

I had a chance to do a photo shoot at a horse farm near Okanagan Falls, B.C. with members of the Penticton Photography Club. I love the articulating LCD screen on the D750, which lets me shoot from ground level.

I had a chance to do a photo shoot at a horse farm near Okanagan Falls, B.C. with members of the Penticton Photography Club. These miniature horses were just the cutest!

I had a chance to do a photo shoot at a horse farm near Okanagan Falls, B.C. with members of the Penticton Photography Club. Another shallow depth of field portrait — this time with my 70-200mm f/2.8.

Christmas and Boxing Day 2014 excursions

Horses feed on hay next to an abandoned house near Anarchist Summit to the east of Osoyoos, B.C. Snow falls gently at this higher elevation, even though there is no snow in the valley below.

I was dreaming of a green Christmas and I got it. But I took a drive up to Anarchist Summit to see the snow at the higher elevation. Christmas was grey, but Boxing Day was gorgeous. I took two walks to the end of Haynes Point Provincial Park, once in the morning by myself and again in the afternoon with Birgit. The park is on a long spit extending out into the lake and in the winter when the lake level is lower a sandspit extends beyond the park almost across the lake. © Richard McGuire Photo.

On a grey, clouding Christmas day the mountain range across the Similkameen Valley is visible from Anarchist Lookout.

A flock of Bohemian Waxwings visits Haynes Point Provincial Park near Osoyoos to feed on rosehips.

A flock of Bohemian Waxwings visits Haynes Point Provincial Park near Osoyoos to feed on rosehips.

Chunks of ice float in the water on the southern shoreline of Haynes Point Provincial Park near Osoyoos. They sounded like chimes as they bobbed up and down on the water, striking against each other.

Dried reeds stick out above the frozen surface of Osoyoos Lake of the southern shore of Haynes Point Provincial Park.

When the level of Osoyoos Lake is lowered in winter, a long sandspit extends from the end of Haynes Point almost across the lake.

When the level of Osoyoos Lake is lowered in winter, a long sandspit extends from the end of Haynes Point almost across the lake.

When the level of Osoyoos Lake is lowered in winter, a long sandspit extends from the end of Haynes Point almost across the lake.

Most of the South Basin of Osoyoos Lake is still open water in late December. Only a little ice appears on the southern shorelines of Haynes Point Provincial Park. In the distance is Washington State.

The water is calm on Osoyoos Lake, looking north from Haynes Point to the town of Osoyoos.

Looking south on Osoyoos Lake from Haynes Point Provincial Park. Washington State is in the distance.

 

Visit to Ken Helm’s car farm and village

Ken Helm shows off an early Buick he is reconstructing from parts acquired from many sources. His workshop is filled with various car parts, tools and just about anything else. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

Ken Helm is a friendly, but eccentric man living in Cawston, B.C. who has the largest collection of cars, old buildings and memorabilia I’ve ever seen. On Sunday a group of us from the Penticton Photography Club had a chance to visit his farm and meet him. He’s moved buildings from all over to his farm and they form a virtual village. Workshops, garages and other buildings are packed with car parts and antiques. Down the hill from the “village” is a boneyard containing vehicles from the 1940s, 1950s and earlier. No doubt every photographer got a very different take on it, but all agreed it was a photographer’s paradise. I’ve added a few photos at the end here from a return visit in 2016. (© Richard McGuire photo)

The remains of of an antique car sit outside in their resting place on the farm of collector Ken Helm near Cawston, B.C. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

This assortment of parts and tools on one of Ken Helm’s workbenches is typical of what can be found in his workshop. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

This BMW Isetta in one of Ken Helm’s workshops near Cawston was a popular car in Europe in the 1950s following the Suez Crisis because it had excellent fuel economy. You open the front to get in, pulling the steering wheel and dashboard out on the door. It had a motorcycle style engine. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

This enclosed porch is home to a large collection of memorabilia on Ken Helm’s farm near Cawston, B.C. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

Below a laneway lined with old buildings and down a hill at Ken Helm’s farm near Cawston is a boneyard of old vehicles ranging from early DeSotos, Hudsons, Mercurys and dozens of old Volkswagen Beetles. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

Time has stood still in this old Mercury in the boneyard at Ken Helm’s farm near Cawston, B.C. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

This classic old Pontiac sits among other 1950s and earlier cars in the boneyard at Ken Helm’s farm near Cawston. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

This classic old Pontiac has bench seats and original components, but the interior is a bit worse for wear. It is among the cars in the boneyard at Ken Helm’s farm near Cawston. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

The remains of of an antique Ford sit outside in their resting place on the farm of collector Ken Helm near Cawston, B.C. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

The grille of and old Ford truck tells stories in its peeling paint and rust at the farm of Ken Helm near Cawston, B.C. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

Ten years ago Tony was passing through Cawston on his way to Australia. Ken Helm invited him to stay and now he fits right in with the collection of old buildings, vehicles and memorabilia, living in an old shop. I first met Tony at a farmers’ market in Kaslo during the summer. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

Tony took me up a fruit picking ladder to the rooftop of one of the wooden buildings at Ken Helm’s farm that afforded a nice view of the Savona Garage, one of the buildings on the main street. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

An old car is parked next to the Corona Court Cafe Cabins at Ken Helm’s farm near Cawston. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

An old 1948 license plate gathers rust among vehicle parts at Ken Helm’s farm near Cawston, B.C. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

Ken Helm gestures as he talks to visitors. He’s now retired, but his impressive collection of old vehicles keeps him busy. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

Many of the old cars had wooden spokes. This one even has tires too. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

A classic gas pump still measures in gallons. No doubt fuel was much cheaper when it was working. Now it sits outside one of the buildings on Ken Helm’s farm near Cawston, B.C. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

Ken Helm (left) and Tony agreed to pose for a photo next to one of the garages on Ken’s farm near Cawston. Both men would do very well in a beard growing contest. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

Ken Helm returns home with the youngsters and dog in one of his many fixed up cars. (Richard McGuire photo)

The vanes or wings of this Radiometer Space Age Sphere spin as the temperature warms them unevenly. (Richard McGuire photo)

The distributor and spark plugs on this old 1916 Buick that Ken Helm is restoring show that the mechanics of century-old vehicles were an art form. (Richard McGuire photo)

Old chains and gears collect dust and cobwebs in one of Ken Helm’s workshops. (Richard McGuire photo)

Autumn Sunday in the Okanagan

Leaves lie on the ground in an orchard near Osoyoos.

It was a pleasant, sunny Sunday, the first day of Standard Time. I took a drive to admire the colours of autumn in the orchards and vineyards around Osoyoos. (Richard McGuire Photo)

Vineyards of different types of grapes turn different colours in autumn in this photo north of Osoyoos.

Grape leaves turn colours as some of the red varieties still remain to be picked.

Grape leaves turn colours as some of the red varieties still remain to be picked.

Late afternoon sun strikes the rows of grapes in a vineyard north of Osoyoos.

Different varieties of grapes turn different colours in autum north of Osoyoos.

Golden sunlight strikes the vineyards in the foreground while farms in the shadow of Mount Kobau have descended into shade.

A vineyard near Okanagan Falls.

The setting sun lights up clouds above Vaseux Lake as yellow vines still give off a glow.

As dusk falls, deer become active. This is on conservation land, but nearby vineyards have high fences, sometimes electrified, to keep the deer out.

A May Sunday in the South Okanagan Grasslands

This little lake next to Kruger Mountain Road is currently surrounded by lush green spring vegetation. Many water birds and others were congregating here.

When I need to recharge my batteries, one of my favourite short trips — about 15 minutes outside Osoyoos — is the South Okanagan Grasslands, Kilpoola Lake and the Sage and Sparrow Conservation Area. It’s accessible by a rough and narrow dirt road that’s probably better suited for a 4X4, but is passable in my VW Golf when it’s dry. This Mother’s Day Sunday the weather was perfect — low 20s — and I spent several hours up there. (© Richard McGuire Photo)

It’s called Blue Lake, but this lake next to Kruger Mountain Road is very green in colour. It is surrounded by flowering bushes.

Kruger Mountain Road is more of a dirt track that becomes narrower and rougher the farther in you go. It winds through forests before emerging in the grasslands.

Kilpoola Lake is a small lake surrounded by grasslands. On a May weekend, a number of people came to fish for rainbow trout, which the lake is stocked with each year.

Cattle cool their heels at the shore of Kilpoola Lake. Cattle ranching is done on parts of the South Okanagan Grasslands.

The road peters out as it crosses a cattle range. This mother and calf stood blocking my car and refused to move. I had to inch closer and closer and they didn’t budge until I was within a couple feet of them.

Kilpoola Lake is surrounded by sweet-smelling sagebrush. On a pleasant May weekend, there was still a lot of green. Later in the summer the area becomes much drier.

The road into Kilpoola Lake is narrow and dirt. It winds through grasslands with sagebrush and the occasional aspen.

A few people fish in boats on small Kilpoola Lake on a May weekend. The lake is stocked each year with rainbow trout.

Clusters of aspens are bright green amidst the sagebrush of the South Okanagan Grasslands above Kilpoola Lake.

On a May weekend there is still snow on the mountains across the Similkameen Valley. A narrow rough road leads into the Sage and Sparrow Conservation Area.

Yellow arrowleaf balsamroot flowers dot the hillside in the Sage and Sparrow Conservation Area.

My little Volkswagen Golf isn’t the best vehicle for exploring some of the rough dirt roads of the South Okanagan Grasslands. Many people opt for 4X4 trucks instead. There’s no room for passing.

On a May weekend there is still snow on the mountains across the Similkameen Valley. This area is right on the Canada-U.S. border, which is more of an invisible line here.

From this hilltop in the South Okanagan Grasslands, you look down into the Similkameen Valley. This point is in Canada, but the valley is in the United States.

Fluffy cumulus clouds roll over the South Okanagan Grasslands, casting moody shadows.

Fluffy cumulus clouds roll over the South Okanagan Grasslands, casting moody shadows.

 

Spring in Osoyoos, B.C.

A bee feeds on nectar in an Okanagan orchard. (Richard McGuire photo)

Throughout April, many flowers in Osoyoos break out in bloom. I especially like the blossoms in the orchards because they mean that fresh fruit like cherries, apples, peaches, nectarines, plums and pears are on their way. (Richard McGuire Photo)

A bee feeds on nectar in an Okanagan orchard. (Richard McGuire photo)

Apple blossoms form a canopy over rows in an orchard on the edge of Osoyoos, B.C. © Richard McGuire Photo

A yellow forsythia bush and yellow tulip glow in the sunlight of a spring day on Osoyoos Lake, B.C. © Richard McGuire Photo

A sign of spring is a flowering magnolia tree. These grow easily in the warm climate of Osoyoos, B.C., but don’t do so well in long cold winters of some other parts of Canada. © Richard McGuire Photo